Brian

Ken Sons and Tim Walsh Toyland digital archive Edit

Summary

Identifier
110.9390
Finding Aid Author
Julia Novakovic
Finding Aid Date
1 May 2013
Description Rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Dates

  • 2010 (Creation)

Extents

  • 0.25 Linear Feet (Whole)
    approx. 65 hours of video footage; 1 TB hard disk

Agent Links

Subjects

Notes

  • Abstract

    The Ken Sons and Tim Walsh Toyland Digital Archive is a collection of more than 65 hours of documentary footage recorded by Ken Sons for his film Toyland. The interviews and scenes were filmed between 2007 and 2010.

  • Conditions Governing Use

    This collection is open for research use by staff of The Strong and by users of its library. Though the donors have not transferred intellectual property rights (including, but not limited to any copyright, trademark, and associated rights therein) to The Strong, they have given permission for The Strong to make copies in all media for museum, educational, and research purposes.

  • Custodial History

    The Ken Sons and Tim Walsh Toyland Digital Archive was donated to The Strong in August 2010 as a gift from Ken Sons of Ken Sons Films and Tim Walsh of The Playmakers. The digital archive was accessioned by The Strong under Object ID 110.9390.

  • Preferred citation for publication

    Ken Sons and Tim Walsh Toyland Digital Archive, Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play at The Strong

  • Historical Note

    Ken Sons, a filmmaker from Sarasota, Florida, read a copy of game designer and historian Tim Walsh’s book Timeless Toys: Classic Toys and the Playmakers Who Created Them and realized the topic would make a compelling documentary. Sons proposed a partnership between them to explore the history behind toy inventing and give a behind-the-scenes look at the $22 billion toy and game business. From 2007 through 2010, Sons and Walsh worked together to interview game inventors and industry professionals.

    Toyland presented the story of Walsh’s attempt to put a new product, Crazy Chins, on the market. Sons followed Walsh as he advanced his toy’s development from paper to prototype, culminating in a meeting with a Mattel executive. Along the way, Toyland featured case studies of classic toys and games with interesting back stories, such as Slinky, Twister, Lite Brite, Play-Doh, and more. Sons and Walsh also met with aspiring toy design students at Otis College of Art and Design and hopeful sellers at the annual American International Toy Fair (commonly referred to as the New York Toy Fair).

    Featured interviewees included: inventor and author Steve Casino; Richard Gill, developer of Pictionary and Trivial Pursuit; Eddy Goldfarb, inventor of Yakity Yak Talking Teeth, Kerplunk, and Battling Tops; Reyn Guyer, inventor of Twister and Nerf; Mike Hirtle from Hasbro; Betty James, developer of Slinky; Milt Levine, inventor of Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm; Burt Meyer, inventor of Lite Brite, Inchworm, Mouse Trap, and Rock ‘em Sock ‘em Robots; Robert Pasin, president of Radio Flyer, Inc.; Don Rosenwinkel, president of Big Monster Toys; John Spinello, developer of Operation; Richie Weintraub of Mattel; Dave Yearick, co-creator of TriBond and designer of Djubi; Kay Zufall, developer of Play-Doh; and more.

    Toyland has won several documentary film awards and highlights some of the most classic and enduring toys and games in recent history.

  • Collection Scope and Content Note

    A digital video archive of Ken Sons and Tim Walsh’s interviews and footage for the documentary Toyland comprise this collection and can be accessed via The Strong’s network drive or by access hard disk drive. The preservation hard disk drive is housed in the archival stacks at the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play. The digital archive contains approximately 65 hours of video footage captured by Ken Sons of Ken Sons Films from 2007-2010. The digital movie files range from 4 seconds to over 60 minutes, with most digital video files between 10 and 15 minutes long. Files include interviews, product demonstrations, supplemental footage, and cutaway shots. Topics range from prominent American toy and game companies and game inventors to classic games and the American International Toy Fair held annually in New York, New York.

  • Related Materials Note

    The Tim Walsh papers, located in the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play at The Strong, contain transcripts of interviews from many of the participants in the Toyland documentary who also contributed stories to Walsh’s book Timeless Toys: Classic Toys and the Playmakers Who Created Them.

    Two copies of the finished documentary DVD of Toyland are housed within the library stacks at the Brian Sutton-Smith Library and Archives of Play.

  • System of Arrangement

    The Toyland digital archive is arranged in the original folders named by Ken Sons. They are separated by interviewee, product, company, or event. Within each topic’s folder is a series of Quicktime movie files, ranging from 4 seconds to over 60 minutes, with most digital video files between 10 and 15 minutes long. File names are original.

External Documents

Instances

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    Accession
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    Box
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    Ken Sons and Tim Walsh Toyland digital archive
  • Type
    Accession
    Container 1 Type
    Object
    Container 1 Indicator
    (digital)
    Container 1 Barcode
    Ken Sons and Tim Walsh Toyland digital archive (digital)

Components